From the Beatles to the Mouse, timely Innovations

Posted by martin.parnell |
From the Beatles to the Mouse, timely Innovations

Fifty years ago, in 1967, the album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, by The Beatles, was released.

It was the band’s eigth studio album and became an immediate commercial and critical success. It spent 27 weeks at the top of the UK albums charts and 15 weeks at number one in the US. The record sold 250,000 copies in Britain in its first week (500,000 by the end of June)

The album and its cover were praised for its innovations in music production, song writing and graphic design, bridging the cultural divide between popular music and legitimate art. In May of this year, in an article on the “Biography” website, Laurie Ulster wrote: The studio’s technology was an important piece of Abbey Road’s creative puzzle. At that time, producers only had four tracks available to work with, and every time they transferred the recording to another tape, they sacrificed some of the quality. The constant improvisation needed to move beyond the restraints of the era spurred the Beatles, along with producer George Martin and engineer Geoff Emerick, to new creative heights as they found innovative and strange ways to get to what they were after. That spirit of experimentation is as much a part of the album as the tracks themselves. 

I decided to take a look back at what other innovations and events came into play that same year. Here are just a few:

During February of 1967, NASA launched the Lunar Orbiter 3 spacecraft The main purpose of the Lunar Orbiter 3 mission was to photograph the surface of the Moon in order to find and analyze potential safe landing sites for future missions in the Surveyor and Apollo programs. The cone-shaped craft also measured radiation and micro-meteoroid impact. The mission lasted for a total of 264 days and it ended in October of that year, after taking 149 medium resolution and 477 high resolution photographs. 

From April through to October of 1967, “Expo 67” was held in Montreal, Canada 

to create the 900 acre site, Montreal built new islands and added to existing islands on the St. Lawrence River, where they then built the 90 pavilions. The expo had 62 participating nations and had over 50 million visitors, making it the most successful World’s Fair of the 20th century.

In the summer of 1967, in New York City, CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) opened its doors. Featuring 117 exhibitors showcasing technology like transistor radios, stereos and black and white televisions, it began a 50 year legacy of innovation.Held in Las Vegas every year, it is the world's gathering place for all who thrive on the business of consumer technologies and where next-generation innovations are introduced to the marketplace.It has been the launch pad for new innovation and technology that has changed the world.

Also, in 1967 Douglas Engelbart filed for the patent on the computer mouse, which he had invented in 1964.  His creation was made from wood and had two gear-wheels that sat perpendicular to one another so as to allow movement on one axis. When you moved the mouse the horizontal wheel moved sideways and the vertical wheel slid along the surface. 

Moving on to this year, here are some of the winners of the 2017 Edison awards:

Diamox by Element Six:  Diamox is a new type of electrochemical cell, using boron-doped diamond electrodes, for treating highly contaminated industrial wastewater without chemical additions. It is a simple on-site modular solution for industry that is cleaner for the environment and can enable safe direct discharge or reuse of process water.

Molekule by Molekule: Molekule has created the world’s first molecular indoor air purifier. Where other air purifiers trap pollutants in filters and eventually re-release them into the air, Molekule is the only air purifier to eliminate all indoor air pollutants (e.g. allergens, VOCs), leaving the air clean and safe to breathe.

Sherwin-Williams Paint Shield is the first EPA-registered microbicide paint that kills certain harmful bacteria on painted surfaces. Representing a game-changing advancement in coatings technology, Paint Shield kills greater than 99.9 percent of these select bacteria within two hours of exposure on a painted surface.

GameChanger Q-LED Sports light by GameChanger is a high-performance lighting system designed for sports venues, with a revolutionary form factor and Internet of Things connectivity at half the cost of competitive systems. Unlike its competitors, GameChanger is bar shaped with proprietary optics which makes it more efficient in its lighting patterns and run wireless from mobile devices.

And if we look into the future, here are some innovations to look forward to, according to Seth Archer, on the Business Insider website:

According to Yigal Nochomovitz, an analyst at Citigroup, eye diseases will affect around 21 million people in the US by the year 2020. If a new way for sustained treatments is developed, it could usurp the current shots and eye drops.  Small implants could deliver drugs to a patient's eye for an extended period and could expand the possible marketplace by $13 billion in the next 15 years,

Robots have traditionally performed repetitive tasks that are easy to program. With new advances in robotics in a variety of fields, industrial robots have a larger base of technology to pull from, and they could do tasks that require more collaboration and communication.

Bendable screens, new materials, and augmented reality may all be contributing factors in the next wave of technology hardware design. Phones could start looking like wallets with folding screens, and TVs may be as thin as paper and transportable by simply rolling them up and taking them with you.

I wonder what innovations have come into everyday use, in your lifetime and which ones you would like to see developed, in the future.

How many of the innovations we have seen developed are likely to last for the next 50 years or is technology moving at such a rate that nothing that is new now will last that long? What innovations might we see in the arts? Who knows, maybe someone will come up with a 2017 album to rival the longevity of Sgt. Pepper.

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