How to embrace Monday mornings and combat the “Blues”.

Posted by martin.parnell |
How to embrace Monday mornings and combat the “Blues”.

Every Monday morning, I open my emails and there’s a message from someone I know in the UK. Alan Stevens, also known as The Media Coach, who posts a weekly 5 minute video on tips to improve your speaking career. Sometimes they are practical, sometimes inspirational, but always worth listening to. I enjoy them because, apart from being very useful, they offer positive messages about how to enhance what I’m already doing and are a positive way to kick-start the week.

For a lot of people, on Monday mornings they feel anything but inspired and positive about the day ahead. They suffer from what is known as the “Monday Blues”. For some people, it starts on a Sunday and can ruin the final part of their weekend. They are daunted about going into work the next day, they are stressed and anxious and, come Monday morning, feel lethargic, negative and miserable.

Unfortunately, feeling this way, can have a negative impact on your performance and productivity—as well as the people around you.

In her article “11 Ways to Beat the Monday Blues”, Forbes staff writer, Jacquelyn Smith, quotes Rita Friedman, a Philadelphia-based career coach says “If you enjoy your job and are passionate about what you're doing, going in to work Monday morning is another opportunity to do what you love". “But if you're feeling under-appreciated or unsatisfied with your job, it can be especially difficult to start another seemingly endless workweek.”

So, what can be done to help deal with this feeling of dread at going back to work at the start of a new week? Smith offers these ideas:

Identify the problem. If you have the Monday Blues most weeks, then this is not something you should laugh off or just live with. It's a significant sign that you are unhappy at work and you need to fix it or move on and find another job. Sara Sutton Fell, CEO and founder of FlexJobs suggests making a list of the things that are bringing you down in your job. “Maybe it’s a negative co-worker or a meeting with your boss first thing on Monday morning, or maybe it’s that you don’t feel challenged--or maybe it’s all of the above,” she says. “In either case, clarifying what is bothering you can help you try to be active in finding solutions. It’s a way of empowering you to take charge and try to improve the situation.” 

Prepare for Monday on Friday. Friedman says. “By taking care of the things you least want to handle at the end of one work week, you're making the start of the next that much better. If you do have any unpleasant tasks awaiting your attention Monday morning, get them done as early as possible so that you don't spend the rest of the day procrastinating.” Alexander  Kjerulf,  founder and Chief Happiness Officer of WooHoo Inc.  “Sunday evening, make a list of three things you look forward to at work that week. This might put you in a more positive mood.” 

Unplug for the weekend. If possible, try to avoid checking work e-mail or voicemail over the weekend, especially if you're not going to respond until Monday anyway, Friedman says. "It can be tempting to know what's waiting for you, but drawing clearly defined boundaries between work and personal time can help keep things in check. Sometimes going back to work on Monday feels especially frustrating because you let it creep into your off-time, and so it never even feels like you had a weekend at all." 

Get enough sleep and wake up early. Go to bed a little early on Sunday night and be sure to get enough sleep so that you wake up feeling well-rested. Although it might seem counter-intuitive, waking up an extra 15 to 30 minutes early on Monday morning can actually make going back to the office easier.

Dress for success.  Sara Sutton Fell, says “When you look good, you feel good. “Feeling good about yourself is half of the battle because rather than being deflated by work you want to face it with confidence.”

Be positive. Try to start the week out with a positive attitude. “When you get to the office, do your best not to be a complainer. In the same vein, don't listen to other people's Monday gripes.” Friedman adds. 

Make someone else happy. Kjerulf says we know from research in positive psychology that one of the best ways to cheer yourself up is to make someone else happy. “You might compliment a co-worker, do something nice for a customer or find some other way to make someone else's day a little better.” 

Keep your Monday schedule light. Knowing that Mondays are traditionally busy days at the office, a good strategy is keep you Monday schedule as clear as possible, Kahn says. “When you’re planning meetings ahead, try to schedule them for Tuesdays and Wednesdays. This will help you to come into Monday with more ease.” 

Have fun at work. Take it upon yourself to take a quick break to catch up with friend in the office. Sharing stories about the weekend with co-workers can be fun and also is a great way to strengthen your interoffice network. 

Have a post-work plan.  Your day shouldn't just be about trudging through Monday to get it over with, but about looking forward to something. “By making Monday a special day where you get to go out with friends or make your favourite dinner the day doesn't have to be all about getting up to go into the office,” Friedman says. You could also plan a favourite activity or hobby for Monday evening.

Are you the employer, team leader, manager or work in HR?  Being aware of how the “Monday Blues” is affecting your workforce is important. For most people, not wanting to go to work on Monday mornings is because weekends are great and they want them to continue, they are tired from the weekend or would just rather be doing other things and the start of another work week means they have to get through five days before the weekend comes around again. But, for most of them, once they are back, they settle in to a routine and that feeling passes.

 

However, if employees are suffering from lengthy periods of depression, beyond the phenomenon of Blue Monday, “they should be taken seriously and investigated if the workplace is the suspected or contributing cause.” says Alexander Kjerulf.

Hopefully, for most employees, the beginning of the working week is a time to set goals, embrace the challenge of a rewarding job and another opportunity to enjoy a sense of achievement.

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